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Book cover of 101 Ways to Help Your Daughter Love Her Body

101 Ways to Help Your Daughter Love Her Body

by Brenda Lane Richardson, Elane Rehr,

Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Pages: 256
Paperback
ISBN: 9780060956677






Available to Buy

Overview of 101 Ways to Help Your Daughter Love Her Body

Sit up straight so your tummy doesn't hang out. Thin is always in. You look so much prettier when you smile. Guys like girls with big boobs. Now that you've got your period, you's better be careful. I'd kill to have legs like yours.

With negative messages bombarding our girls on a daily basis — from misguided adults, from peers, from the media — how can our daughters possibly feel good about their bodies? While you may not single-handedly be able to change society there are ways to make sure that your daughter's sense of self is strong and sustaining. In fact, this hands-on guide offers 101 ways!

In 101 Ways to Help Your Daughter Love Her Body, two mothers — one a clinical psychologist, the other an award-winning journalist — have teamed up to provide parents with practical ideas tailored to girls from birth through the teenage years. These initiatives inform parents and encourage them to take active roles in helping their daughters develop confidence, treat their bodies with love and respect, and make peace with their unique builds so that they can revel in a sense of femaleness and physical competence.

Psychologically astute and fun to read, this proactive guide will help define a new generation of healthy girls. There's no better time than now to help our daughters, young and growing, learn to love their bodies.

Synopsis of 101 Ways to Help Your Daughter Love Her Body

Sit up straight so your tummy doesn't hang out. Thin is always in. You look so much prettier when you smile. Guys like girls with big boobs. Now that you've got your period, you's better be careful. I'd kill to have legs like yours.

With negative messages bombarding our girls on a daily basis — from misguided adults, from peers, from the media — how can our daughters possibly feel good about their bodies? While you may not single-handedly be able to change society there are ways to make sure that your daughter's sense of self is strong and sustaining. In fact, this hands-on guide offers 101 ways!

In 101 Ways to Help Your Daughter Love Her Body, two mothers — one a clinical psychologist, the other an award-winning journalist — have teamed up to provide parents with practical ideas tailored to girls from birth through the teenage years. These initiatives inform parents and encourage them to take active roles in helping their daughters develop confidence, treat their bodies with love and respect, and make peace with their unique builds so that they can revel in a sense of femaleness and physical competence.

Psychologically astute and fun to read, this proactive guide will help define a new generation of healthy girls. There's no better time than now to help our daughters, young and growing, learn to love their bodies.

New Moon Network

A very specific and helpful guide for concerned parents and other adults...particularly handy.

About the Author, Brenda Lane Richardson

Brenda Lane Richardson has written and ghostwritten numerous books, including Girl, Make Your Money Grow!, an investment guide for African Americans, which was featured on Oprah as part of the month-long Debt Diet series.

Reviews of 101 Ways to Help Your Daughter Love Her Body

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Editorials

Jacquelyn Mitchard

"This book is better than the usual. Both honest and gentle, it doesn’t condemn. It acknowledges every mother’s wish…."

New Moon Network

"A very specific and helpful guide for concerned parents and other adults…particularly handy."

New Moon Network

A very specific and helpful guide for concerned parents and other adults...particularly handy.

VOYA

From Barbies to Britney Spears, developing girls are bombarded with sounds and images that make the process of body acceptance and the healthy self-esteem related to it difficult in today's culture. Journalist Richardson and Rehr, a professor of women's and adolescent psychology, provide practical ideas to help parents examine their role in body acceptance and become a positive influence in the lives of their daughters. Their book is organized into thirteen chapters that look at various aspects of body image development, not only through the role of parents but also through emotions, basic health and eating habits, safety issues, and positive sexuality. Within each chapter short, enumerated advice is presented. Tip #29 is to encourage reading. The advice uses a variety of tactics from talking about things, such as deconstructing images and discussing feelings, to doing things, such as learning to swim and remembering old jump-rope rhymes. Readers can focus on certain topics such as sexuality, read the whole book through, or pick out an idea here or there for reflection. This book's conservative tendencies might not be embraced by all readers, but the ideas are solid and can be adapted and applied according to personal tastes. Richardson and Rehr write a well-organized and thoroughly thought-out handbook for any parent, teacher, or professional looking for practical, realistic ways to help teenage girls develop a healthy body image. This book is highly recommended. Notes. 2001, Quill/HarperCollins, 225p, $13 pb. Ages Adult. Reviewer:Karen Jensen—VOYA, December 2001 (Vol. 24, No. 5)

Library Journal

With the goal of boosting girls' self-esteem and self-image, these two mothers Richardson is an author, journalist, and speaker, while Rehr is a professor of women's psychology have collaborated on this well-meaning collection of child-rearing tips. Their suggestions range in length from one to two pages and cover topics such as nutrition, positive role modeling, fostering emotional well-being, and physical fitness. While the tips themselves are useful, the book's format tends to fragment the authors' message and make them repeat their points. Although the authors' goals are admirable, and information is needed (the Eating Disorders Awareness Prevention web site estimates that on any given day, about 50 percent of American girls are dieting), this work will have limited appeal. It is directed to parents (primarily mothers), but it ranges so broadly from preschool-age to teenage girls that the core audience may be hard to identify. Recommended only for large collections. Kay Brodie, Chesapeake Coll., Wye Mills, MD Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

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