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Book cover of 30 Second Seduction: Advertisers' Changing Tactics and the Women Who Fall for Them

30 Second Seduction: Advertisers' Changing Tactics and the Women Who Fall for Them

by Andrea Gardner

Publisher: Avalon Publishing Group
Pages: 283
Paperback
ISBN: 9781580052122






Available to Buy

Overview of 30 Second Seduction: Advertisers' Changing Tactics and the Women Who Fall for Them

Why are you drawn to one box of cereal over another or one brand of jeans over another? Why do you think about that model with the gorgeous skin when you are buying moisturizer?

In 30-Second Seduction, Andrea Gardner sheds light on the many ways advertisers target and seduce women. Ads impact every woman in a different way. Prepare yourself for the seduction by knowing why you buy.

Synopsis of 30 Second Seduction: Advertisers' Changing Tactics and the Women Who Fall for Them

Have you ever wondered why you’re drawn to one type of cereal over another or why you think of that model with the gorgeous skin when you are buying a bottle of lotion?

You are being seduced by the advertising industry. Every consumer choice you make—from what soap to buy to which car to drive—has been influenced by advertising.

In 30-Second Seduction author and Marketplace reporter Andrea Gardner focuses on the many ways that advertising targets women and how those ads affect decisions, purchases, and everyday life.

When writing 30-Second Seduction, Andrea interviewed a handful of women from diverse backgrounds, of all ages, and from different parts of the U.S. to uncover how advertising impacts every woman in different ways—from their reactions to specific ads to the television ads they found most memorable and what brands they bought recently. She also talks to marketing professionals from companies like Dove, Kimberly Clark, Lee, and Proctor Gamble to find out how they are seeking to break through the ad clutter and enchant women. Ultimately, Andrea argues that advertising isn’t a bad thing for women. It is important for women to be informed, objective buyers.

Publishers Weekly

In this frequently facile survey of modern-day marketing, freelance business reporter Gardner likens successful advertisers to good flirts and examines their various strategies for wooing women. Borrowing advertisers' approach, she divides the industry into nine different classifications, assigning each a catchy label and devoting a chapter to its tactics. "The scholar" relies heavily on market research; "the show-off" depends on coolness and humor; "the sneak" employs product placement and paid word-of-mouth promotion; "the fence mender" embraces cause-related marketing. Gardner provides examples of each, from classics like "Calgon, take me away" ("the romantic" touting luxury and indulgence) to the "Share Your Secret" campaign for Procter & Gamble's deodorant ("the best friend" forging a bond with other women). Although this framework is a promising conceit, the boundaries between categories are fluid enough that some are easily confused. Moreover, Gardner is prone to broad generalizations and unsupported pronouncements that raise doubts about the depth and breadth of her reporting. Based largely on anecdotal research-interviews with marketing professionals and "everyday women"-the book lacks independent or scholarly research. Gardner also vacillates between criticism and admiration: she calls on women to exercise their buying power to demand advertising that is more "empowering, entertaining, and realistic" yet offers few concrete strategies, leaving readers to puzzle over the book's raison d'être. (Apr.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information

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Editorials

Publishers Weekly

In this frequently facile survey of modern-day marketing, freelance business reporter Gardner likens successful advertisers to good flirts and examines their various strategies for wooing women. Borrowing advertisers' approach, she divides the industry into nine different classifications, assigning each a catchy label and devoting a chapter to its tactics. "The scholar" relies heavily on market research; "the show-off" depends on coolness and humor; "the sneak" employs product placement and paid word-of-mouth promotion; "the fence mender" embraces cause-related marketing. Gardner provides examples of each, from classics like "Calgon, take me away" ("the romantic" touting luxury and indulgence) to the "Share Your Secret" campaign for Procter & Gamble's deodorant ("the best friend" forging a bond with other women). Although this framework is a promising conceit, the boundaries between categories are fluid enough that some are easily confused. Moreover, Gardner is prone to broad generalizations and unsupported pronouncements that raise doubts about the depth and breadth of her reporting. Based largely on anecdotal research-interviews with marketing professionals and "everyday women"-the book lacks independent or scholarly research. Gardner also vacillates between criticism and admiration: she calls on women to exercise their buying power to demand advertising that is more "empowering, entertaining, and realistic" yet offers few concrete strategies, leaving readers to puzzle over the book's raison d'ĂȘtre. (Apr.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information

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