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Book cover of A Community of Many Worlds: Arab Americans in New York City

A Community of Many Worlds: Arab Americans in New York City

by Museum of the City of New York

Publisher: Syracuse University Press
Pages: 280
Hardcover
ISBN: 9780815607397






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Overview of A Community of Many Worlds: Arab Americans in New York City

A collection of academics, poets, activists, and others contribute 17 essays that collectively draw a portrait of Arab American life in New York, from the early Syrian immigrants of the late 19th-century to the present. Personal recollections accompany more scholarly examinations of the mosques of the city, recent Arab contributions to the arts, cultural traditions of early immigrants, and anti-Arab bias in Hollywood films. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Synopsis of A Community of Many Worlds: Arab Americans in New York City

A collection of academics, poets, activists, and others contribute 17 essays that collectively draw a portrait of Arab American life in New York, from the early Syrian immigrants of the late 19th-century to the present. Personal recollections accompany more scholarly examinations of the mosques of the city, recent Arab contributions to the arts, cultural traditions of early immigrants, and anti-Arab bias in Hollywood films. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Publishers Weekly

Published in conjunction with an exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York, this collection of 17 essays ranges from the personal to the academic and covers a wide array of topics, such as Arabic poetry, immigration patterns, community formation and the sustaining of cultural traditions. A big challenge, writes curator Kathleen Benson in her preface, "was encompassing the great heterogeneity of `Arab New York' ", given the multitude of immigrant nationalities that fall under that rubric. This collection does a fine job documenting and elucidating the diverse abundance of Arabic cultural manifestations that reflect historic precedents, and are contributing toward hybridized world views. Gregory Orfela's "My Mother's Zither" places Arab-American poetry in a specific U.S. tradition (Kahlil Gibran was influenced by Stephen Crane) and discusses the political content of work by new poets. "The Syrian Jews of Brooklyn" by Walter P. Zinner profoundly challenges preconceived ideas of identity in its discussion of the complex social and religious practices of a small group whose religion and ethnicity seem, to many, to be at odds with one another. Jerrilynn Dodd's "NY-MASJID: The Mosques of New York" notes the interplay of architecture and religious observance; in a country that often conflates Muslim "style" and belief, imams repeatedly tell her, "in prayer all external concerns must vanish." The pieces are often personal and include multiple reminiscences of growing up Arab-American, yet strike a clear and instructive balance with sound scholarship and intellectual inquiry. (July) Forecast: Though edited collections often go unreviewed, and few readers will seek this one out, the conjunction of two recent points of interest, New York City and Arab-Americans, should bring browsers to this title if it is displayed. Other scholarly books that could be included are The Muslims in America (Oxford), Islam in America (Columbia), Windows of Faith: Muslim-American Scholar Activists in North America (Syracuse) and Muslims on the Americanization Path? (Oxford). Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

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Editorials

Publishers Weekly

Published in conjunction with an exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York, this collection of 17 essays ranges from the personal to the academic and covers a wide array of topics, such as Arabic poetry, immigration patterns, community formation and the sustaining of cultural traditions. A big challenge, writes curator Kathleen Benson in her preface, "was encompassing the great heterogeneity of `Arab New York' ", given the multitude of immigrant nationalities that fall under that rubric. This collection does a fine job documenting and elucidating the diverse abundance of Arabic cultural manifestations that reflect historic precedents, and are contributing toward hybridized world views. Gregory Orfela's "My Mother's Zither" places Arab-American poetry in a specific U.S. tradition (Kahlil Gibran was influenced by Stephen Crane) and discusses the political content of work by new poets. "The Syrian Jews of Brooklyn" by Walter P. Zinner profoundly challenges preconceived ideas of identity in its discussion of the complex social and religious practices of a small group whose religion and ethnicity seem, to many, to be at odds with one another. Jerrilynn Dodd's "NY-MASJID: The Mosques of New York" notes the interplay of architecture and religious observance; in a country that often conflates Muslim "style" and belief, imams repeatedly tell her, "in prayer all external concerns must vanish." The pieces are often personal and include multiple reminiscences of growing up Arab-American, yet strike a clear and instructive balance with sound scholarship and intellectual inquiry. (July) Forecast: Though edited collections often go unreviewed, and few readers will seek this one out, the conjunction of two recent points of interest, New York City and Arab-Americans, should bring browsers to this title if it is displayed. Other scholarly books that could be included are The Muslims in America (Oxford), Islam in America (Columbia), Windows of Faith: Muslim-American Scholar Activists in North America (Syracuse) and Muslims on the Americanization Path? (Oxford). Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Booknews

A collection of academics, poets, activists, and others contribute 17 essays that collectively draw a portrait of Arab American life in New York, from the early Syrian immigrants of the late 19th-century to the present. Personal recollections accompany more scholarly examinations of the mosques of the city, recent Arab contributions to the arts, cultural traditions of early immigrants, and anti-Arab bias in Hollywood films. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

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