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Book cover of A Corporate Form Of Freedom

A Corporate Form Of Freedom

by Norman Silber

Publisher: Westview Press
Pages: 200
Paperback
ISBN: 9780813397627






Available to Buy

Overview of A Corporate Form Of Freedom

A Corporate Form of Freedom explores how courts and legislatures have decided which nonprofit groups can pursue their missions as corporations. For many years it was a privilege to hold a nonprofit charter. This view changed during the 1950s and 1960s. A new generation contended that legal theory, racial justice, and democratic values demanded that the nonprofit corporate form be available to all groups as a matter of right. As a result, nonprofit corporate status became America's corporate form for free expression. The new perspective did more than enlarge public discourse, however. It also reduced official authority to supervise or otherwise hold nonprofit organizations accountable for their activities. Norman I. Silber examines how the nonprofit world was transformed -- a transformation which refashioned political and social discourse, altered the economy, and created many of the difficulties the nonprofit sector faces today.

Synopsis of A Corporate Form Of Freedom

Focusing upon the laws and judicial opinions that have shaped practices in New York and in other states, A Corporate Form of Freedom provides an historical account to explain how and why getting a nonprofit corporate charter came to be a matter of right instead of a privilege--and why the nonprofit corporate form today is treated as generously as it is by the law.

Booknews

Silber (law, Hofstra U.) explores how US courts and legislatures have decided which nonprofit groups can pursue their missions as corporations. He explains that in the 1950s and 1960s, people began contending that legal theory, racial justice, and democratic values demanded that the nonprofit corporate form be available to all groups as a matter of right. As a result, he says, the nonprofit became the country's corporate form for free expression. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

About the Author, Norman Silber

Norman I. Silber is a professor of law at Hofstra University. He teaches and writes on nonprofit law, legal history, and consumer law. Silber holds aPh.D. in history from Yale and a J.D. from Columbia University.

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Booknews

Silber (law, Hofstra U.) explores how US courts and legislatures have decided which nonprofit groups can pursue their missions as corporations. He explains that in the 1950s and 1960s, people began contending that legal theory, racial justice, and democratic values demanded that the nonprofit corporate form be available to all groups as a matter of right. As a result, he says, the nonprofit became the country's corporate form for free expression. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

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