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Book cover of A Day in the Life of a Colonial Schoolteacher

A Day in the Life of a Colonial Schoolteacher

by Kathy Wilmore, K. Wilmore

Publisher: Rosen Publishing Group, Incorporated, The
Pages: 24
Library Binding
ISBN: 9780823954292






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Synopsis of A Day in the Life of a Colonial Schoolteacher

Describes a day in a colonial American dame school, including who attended, what they learned, and what chores they did.

Children's Literature

Wigs were a popular fashion of the Colonial Period. Skilled wigmakers learned their craft first as an apprentice, then as a journeyman. If they were successful, the next step would be to own their own shop and to develop a customer base. Readers learn that there were at least 100 different styles of wigs made from a variety of materials--most expensive was human hair, then horsehair or natural fibers. Pictures show the wig-making process and a good selection of the styles. Wigs were hot and heavy. Men shaved their heads so many wigmakers also did barbering. Surprisingly, wigs came in a variety of colors and only red was considered unattractive. Colored powder was used to make the very popular blue wigs. Tinted pages with an old fashioned look set the tone of this nonfiction book. There are references to web sites, a glossary and an index. Part of "The Library of Living and Working in Colonial Times" series. 2000, Rosen, Ages 7 up, $17.26. Reviewer: Marilyn Courtot

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Children's Literature - Children's Literature

Wigs were a popular fashion of the Colonial Period. Skilled wigmakers learned their craft first as an apprentice, then as a journeyman. If they were successful, the next step would be to own their own shop and to develop a customer base. Readers learn that there were at least 100 different styles of wigs made from a variety of materials--most expensive was human hair, then horsehair or natural fibers. Pictures show the wig-making process and a good selection of the styles. Wigs were hot and heavy. Men shaved their heads so many wigmakers also did barbering. Surprisingly, wigs came in a variety of colors and only red was considered unattractive. Colored powder was used to make the very popular blue wigs. Tinted pages with an old fashioned look set the tone of this nonfiction book. There are references to web sites, a glossary and an index. Part of "The Library of Living and Working in Colonial Times" series. 2000, Rosen, Ages 7 up, $17.26. Reviewer: Marilyn Courtot

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