Discover Free Books That You'll Love!
Receive unbeatable eBook deals in your favorite fiction or non-fiction genres. Our daily emails are packed with new and bestselling authors you will love!

 

Amazon Kindle  Kobo  Nook  Google  Audible  Apple iBooks
Book cover of A Life's Mosaic: The Autobiography of Pyllis Ntantala

A Life's Mosaic: The Autobiography of Pyllis Ntantala

by Phyllis Ntantala

Publisher: Jacana Media
Pages: 256
Paperback
ISBN: 9781770096707






Available to Buy

Overview of A Life's Mosaic: The Autobiography of Pyllis Ntantala

Raised in a family of landed gentry located in Transkei, a region now part of South Africa, during the early 20th century, this vivid and spirited autobiography shares the unique story of a black woman’s search for identity and fulfillment through turbulent times. Phyllis Ntantala’s gripping story is not of a struggle to escape from poverty but of a life of relative privilege that typically cut across the boundaries of apartheid. In the early 1960s, when the restrictive net of apartheid grew ever tighter, she moved to the United States; but instead of finding freedom and opportunity, she found racial discriminations that were sadly too familiar. Evocatively described with searing honesty, the politics and feminism of this narrative are grounded in the need to carve out a space for one's own voice.

Synopsis of A Life's Mosaic: The Autobiography of Pyllis Ntantala

Raised in a family of landed gentry located in Transkei, a region now part of South Africa, during the early 20th century, this vivid and spirited autobiography shares the unique story of a black woman’s search for identity and fulfillment through turbulent times. Phyllis Ntantala’s gripping story is not of a struggle to escape from poverty but of a life of relative privilege that typically cut across the boundaries of apartheid. In the early 1960s, when the restrictive net of apartheid grew ever tighter, she moved to the United States; but instead of finding freedom and opportunity, she found racial discriminations that were sadly too familiar. Evocatively described with searing honesty, the politics and feminism of this narrative are grounded in the need to carve out a space for one's own voice.

Publishers Weekly

Ntantala has written a rather dry account of a vivid and interesting life. Born to a well-to-do black family in the Transkei, in South Africa, she describes her awakening social conscience in the 1940s and her subsequent activities in the teachers' union. But she matter-of-factly retraces her experiences while revealing little about her emotional states. Writing of how much she and her husband expected of their children intellectually, she posits that the children ``lived in a world of ideas.'' She makes much of the fact that she came from a well-off family, and hints at a struggle between her principles and her social position, particularly in a section about how her children always forced her and her husband to treat their employees better. There is also some underlying conflict with her more straitlaced husband, who, she says, in one of her few blunt moments, ``never was a lover, but a husband,'' but these tensions are touched upon only briefly. Some excitement builds when the family arrives in the U.S. in the 1960s, and the comparisons between racism in South Africa and in Madison, Wis., where her husband taught, are telling, but marred by Ntantala's frustrating habit of drifting from one subject to the next. (Feb.)\

About the Author, Phyllis Ntantala

Phyllis Ntantala is a writer. She lives in Michigan.

Reviews of A Life's Mosaic: The Autobiography of Pyllis Ntantala

There are no reviews yet. Perhaps you can add one!

Editorials

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly

Ntantala has written a rather dry account of a vivid and interesting life. Born to a well-to-do black family in the Transkei, in South Africa, she describes her awakening social conscience in the 1940s and her subsequent activities in the teachers' union. But she matter-of-factly retraces her experiences while revealing little about her emotional states. Writing of how much she and her husband expected of their children intellectually, she posits that the children ``lived in a world of ideas.'' She makes much of the fact that she came from a well-off family, and hints at a struggle between her principles and her social position, particularly in a section about how her children always forced her and her husband to treat their employees better. There is also some underlying conflict with her more straitlaced husband, who, she says, in one of her few blunt moments, ``never was a lover, but a husband,'' but these tensions are touched upon only briefly. Some excitement builds when the family arrives in the U.S. in the 1960s, and the comparisons between racism in South Africa and in Madison, Wis., where her husband taught, are telling, but marred by Ntantala's frustrating habit of drifting from one subject to the next. (Feb.)\

Available to Buy

Follow Us