Discover Free Books That You'll Love!
Receive unbeatable eBook deals in your favorite fiction or non-fiction genres. Our daily emails are packed with new and bestselling authors you will love!

 

Amazon Kindle  Kobo  Nook  Google  Audible  Apple iBooks
Book cover of After-School Theatre Programs for At-Risk Teenagers

After-School Theatre Programs for At-Risk Teenagers

by Philip Zwerling

Publisher: McFarland & Company, Incorporated Publishers
Pages: 252
Paperback
ISBN: 9780786431878






Available to Buy

Overview of After-School Theatre Programs for At-Risk Teenagers

Where intervention programs such as D.A.R.E. and "Scared Straight" have failed to adequately address the problems of at-risk teenagers, inexpensive and easily-implemented after school theatre programs may offer promising new possibilities. This book suggests that low-cost, non-coercive theatre programs can demonstrably lower the incidence of youth violence, drug use, teen pregnancy, truancy, and gang membership. The author considers the problems facing today's teenagers, discusses the history of using theatre for social change in the United States and Britain, and takes an in-depth look at three U.S. theatre programs. An appendix provides an alphabetical directory of 106 after school theatre programs in the U.S., including contact information and a brief description of each program.

Synopsis of After-School Theatre Programs for At-Risk Teenagers

Where intervention programs such as D.A.R.E. and "Scared Straight" have failed to adequately address the problems of at-risk teenagers, inexpensive and easily-implemented after school theatre programs may offer promising new possibilities. This book suggests that low-cost, non-coercive theatre programs can demonstrably lower the incidence of youth violence, drug use, teen pregnancy, truancy, and gang membership. The author considers the problems facing today's teenagers, discusses the history of using theatre for social change in the United States and Britain, and takes an in-depth look at three U.S. theatre programs. An appendix provides an alphabetical directory of 106 after school theatre programs in the U.S., including contact information and a brief description of each program.

School Library Journal

Not until late in chapter five does Zwerling actually begin discussing the central theme of his book, programs for at-risk teens. Up to that point, readers must wade through distilled chapters from the authora's dissertation rife with dated youth-violence statistics and the history and theory of community theatre both in the U.S. and in Latin America. Finally, in chapters six through nine, the author presents three after-school programs that he has observed and surveys of the teen participants. He also discusses the results of his research and the programsa' efficacy in general. In that substantive, although plodding final chapter, Zwerling makes a good case for providing theatre programs for at-risk youth, even though it is clear that some are more successful than others. An annotated appendix of selected programs in the U.S. is appended.-Betty S. Evans, Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield

About the Author, Philip Zwerling

Philip Zwerling, an assistant professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Texas Pan American in Edinburg, Texas, is the author of more than 200 magazine and newspaper articles.

Reviews of After-School Theatre Programs for At-Risk Teenagers

There are no reviews yet. Perhaps you can add one!

Editorials

School Library Journal

Not until late in chapter five does Zwerling actually begin discussing the central theme of his book, programs for at-risk teens. Up to that point, readers must wade through distilled chapters from the authora's dissertation rife with dated youth-violence statistics and the history and theory of community theatre both in the U.S. and in Latin America. Finally, in chapters six through nine, the author presents three after-school programs that he has observed and surveys of the teen participants. He also discusses the results of his research and the programsa' efficacy in general. In that substantive, although plodding final chapter, Zwerling makes a good case for providing theatre programs for at-risk youth, even though it is clear that some are more successful than others. An annotated appendix of selected programs in the U.S. is appended.-Betty S. Evans, Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield

Available to Buy

Follow Us