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Book cover of I Don't Want to Talk about It

I Don't Want to Talk about It

by Jeanie Franz Ransom, Kathryn Kunz Finney

Publisher: American Psychological Association
Pages: 28
Hardcover
ISBN: 9781557986641






Available to Buy

Overview of I Don't Want to Talk about It

When a child's parents tell her they decided to divorce, the last thing she wants to do is talk about it. Instead, she wants to roar as loud as a lion so she can't hear their painful words, or turn into a fish and hide her tears in the sea, or even become a bird and fly away. But with her mother and father's help, she starts to consider what life will be like after the divorce and learns that although some things will change, many other things will remain the same. Most importantly, she realizes that although her parents may not agree on is that they both love her very much and will always be her mom and dad. Published under the auspices of the American Psychological Association, this book offers parents a valuable tool for initiating a dialogue with their children about divorce. The story reveals the full range of feelings that a young child might experience when the family is confronting divorce, including anger, grief, fear, and loneliness. The book also explores a child's basic concerns about the reasons for the divorce and about what life will be like afterward. Using images of animals that young children will easily relate to, I Don't Want to Talk About It reassures children that it is normal to feel as fierce as a crocodile or as a kangaroo. Most importantly, it emphasizes that divorce does not change parents' love and commitment regarding their children.

In a Note to Parents, Dr. Philip Stahl, an author and psychologist specializing in divorce and custody issues, tells parents what expect from their children when facing divorce and offers practical guidance for helping these children make the healthiest adjustment possible. About the Author:

Jeanie Franz Ransom, M.A. holds a degree in professional counseling and writes extensively for children and parents. Her articles have appeared in national magazines, including American Baby and Family Fun, and this is her second children's book. She lives with her husband and three sons near St. Louis, Missouri.

About the Illustrator:

Kathyrn Kunz Finney received her degree in graphic design from College of Art and Design at Iowa State University, Ames. This is her second book for children. She lives with her husband, daughter, and son in Des Moines, Iowa.

Synopsis of I Don't Want to Talk about It

When a child's parents tell her they decided to divorce, the last thing she wants to do is talk about it. Instead, she wants to roar as loud as a lion so she can't hear their painful words, or turn into a fish and hide her tears in the sea, or even become a bird and fly away. But with her mother and father's help, she starts to consider what life will be like after the divorce and learns that although some things will change, many other things will remain the same. Most importantly, she realizes that although her parents may not agree on is that they both love her very much and will always be her mom and dad. Published under the auspices of the American Psychological Association, this book offers parents a valuable tool for initiating a dialogue with their children about divorce. The story reveals the full range of feelings that a young child might experience when the family is confronting divorce, including anger, grief, fear, and loneliness. The book also explores a child's basic concerns about the reasons for the divorce and about what life will be like afterward. Using images of animals that young children will easily relate to, I Don't Want to Talk About It reassures children that it is normal to feel as fierce as a crocodile or as a kangaroo. Most importantly, it emphasizes that divorce does not change parents' love and commitment regarding their children.

In a Note to Parents, Dr. Philip Stahl, an author and psychologist specializing in divorce and custody issues, tells parents what expect from their children when facing divorce and offers practical guidance for helping these children make the healthiest adjustment possible. About the Author:

Jeanie Franz Ransom, M.A. holds a degree in professional counseling and writes extensively for children and parents. Her articles have appeared in national magazines, including American Baby and Family Fun, and this is her second children's book. She lives with her husband and three sons near St. Louis, Missouri.

About the Illustrator:

Kathyrn Kunz Finney received her degree in graphic design from College of Art and Design at Iowa State University, Ames. This is her second book for children. She lives with her husband, daughter, and son in Des Moines, Iowa.

Parent Council Reviews

Here is a very creative approach to dealing with the feelings associated with divorce. The author uses images of animals to depict the feelings the young girl is having difficulty expressing. For example, she wants to be a fish "so that my tears could fall into the river and no one would know how much I wanted to cry." The illustrations are wonderful! Even though the topic is serious, the illustrations will make the reader smile because the image of various animals is superimposed on the scene. This book has the right balance of interesting presentations and useful information. The author also gives the parents an excellent guide for helping children cope. 2000, Magination Press, $14.95. Ages 3 to 8. Reviewer: S. Latson SOURCE: Parent Council Volume 8

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Editorials

From The Critics

Here is a very creative approach to dealing with the feelings associated with divorce. The author uses images of animals to depict the feelings the young girl is having difficulty expressing. For example, she wants to be a fish "so that my tears could fall into the river and no one would know how much I wanted to cry." The illustrations are wonderful! Even though the topic is serious, the illustrations will make the reader smile because the image of various animals is superimposed on the scene. This book has the right balance of interesting presentations and useful information. The author also gives the parents an excellent guide for helping children cope. 2000, Magination Press, $14.95. Ages 3 to 8. Reviewer: S. Latson SOURCE: Parent Council Volume 8

School Library Journal

K-Gr 3-A competent piece of bibliotherapy aimed at helping children of divorce deal with their new, difficult, and conflicting emotions. Told by a young girl whose parents have just told her they are getting a divorce, the narrative then goes through the range of the child's possible emotions, as the adults suggest how she might be feeling. She, in turn, imagines herself to be an animal that would adequately express her emotions. When her father tells her that it's OK to be scared, her response is, "I wanted to be a lion with a roar so loud that everyone would think I was very brave." Assurances of her parents' continued love and that certain family rituals will remain the same make her feel better. Full-page illustrations capably portray the images in the text, especially the metaphors of the animals that the girl uses to express her feelings. The book concludes with a two-page note to parents suggesting ways to deal with their children's reactions. A worthy and appropriate addition to most parenting collections.-Jane Marino, Scarsdale Public Library, NY Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Paul Chance, PhD

Children of divorce often find it difficult to voice their feelings. I Don't Want to Talk About It helps them do so by using animal metaphors to illustrate the emotions of a little girl whose parents are breaking up...this book is intended for children ages 4 to 10. An afterword by Philip Stahl, PhD., offers practical ways for parents to help kids cope.
—Psychology Today

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