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Book cover of "My Heart Is a Large Kingdom": Selected Letters of Margaret Fuller

"My Heart Is a Large Kingdom": Selected Letters of Margaret Fuller

by Margaret Fuller, Robert N. Hudspeth, Robert N. Hudspeth (Editor)

Publisher: Cornell University Press
Pages: 368
Hardcover
ISBN: 9780801437472






Available to Buy

Overview of "My Heart Is a Large Kingdom": Selected Letters of Margaret Fuller

This single-volume selection of the letters of Margaret Fuller affords a unique opportunity for renewed acquaintance with a great American thinker of the Transcendentalist circle. The letters represent Fuller at all stages of her life and career, and show her engaged as literary critic, as translator and as champion of German literature and thought, as teacher, as travel writer, as literary editor, as journalist, as feminist, as revolutionary, as wife and mother. "My Heart Is a Large Kingdom," unlike previous collections, includes only letters transcribed from Fuller's manuscripts and does not reproduce correspondence known only from printed sources and copies in hands other than Fuller's.Among the recipients of the letters in this generous selection are such literary and cultural figures as Bronson Alcott, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Arthur Hugh Clough, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Giuseppe Mazzini, Giovanni Angelo Ossoli (Fuller's husband), George Ripley, and Henry David Thoreau. Taken together, the letters serve as a chronicle of Fuller's lifetime and provide glimpses into her thoughts and feelings during the years of the "Conversations," Dial, and the revolution in Rome.

Synopsis of "My Heart Is a Large Kingdom": Selected Letters of Margaret Fuller

"My friend! believe what I say, for I am self-conscious now. You have touched my heart, and it thrilled at the centre, but that is all. My heart is a large kingdom. But your heart, your precious heart! (I am determined to be absolutely frank,) that I did long for. I saw how precious it is, how much more precious may be. And you have cruelly hung it up quite out of my reach, and declare I never shall have it. O das ist hart. For no price! There is something I am not to have at any price. Das ist hart. You must not give it away in my sight at any rate, but you may give away all your prudence and calculations, and arrangements, which seem so unlike your fairer self, to whomsoever you like."—Margaret Fuller to James Nathan, Monday April 14, 1845

This single-volume selection of the letters of Margaret Fuller affords a unique opportunity for renewed acquaintance with a great American thinker of the Transcendentalist circle. The letters represent Fuller at all stages of her life and career, and show her engaged as literary critic, as translator and as champion of German literature and thought, as teacher, as travel writer, as literary editor, as journalist, as feminist, as revolutionary, as wife and mother. My Heart Is a Large Kingdom, unlike previous collections, includes only letters transcribed from Fuller's manuscripts and does not reproduce correspondence known only from printed sources and copies in hands other than Fuller's.

Among the recipients of the letters in this generous selection are such literary and cultural figures as Bronson Alcott, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Arthur Hugh Clough, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Giuseppe Mazzini, Giovanni Angelo Ossoli (Fuller's husband), George Ripley, and Henry David Thoreau. Taken together, the letters serve as a chronicle of Fuller's lifetime and provide glimpses into her thoughts and feelings during the years of the "Conversations," Dial, and the revolution in Rome.
About the Editor:
Robert N. Hudspeth is Professor of English at the University of Redlands. He is the author of Ellery Channing and the editor of the six-volume Letters of Margaret Fuller, also available from Cornell, from which this selection is drawn.

Publishers Weekly

Fuller (1810-1850) was the "it girl" of Transcendentalism and one of the most trenchant critics and insightful thinkers 19th-century America produced. She translated German literature, wrote for the New York Daily Tribune and edited the Transcendentalist magazine the Dial. In this valuable collection of Fuller's private correspondence, readers will find a precocious eight-year-old Margaret writing to her "Papa," assuring him that "If you have spies they will certainly inform you that we are not very dissipated," and keeping him apprised of her Latin studies. At 20, Fuller articulates her controversial religious convictions to a cousin. In a letter to her mother, she describes her whirlwind travels to Europe, admitting that she's relieved finally to be in one place for six months. Among the most revealing are her letters to James Freeman Clarke, a distant cousin, about Goethe, about the marriages of mutual acquaintances and about God. The letters to Emerson, Fuller's fellow Transcendentalist (and her successor at the Dial), are also a delight. A May 1843 dispute between the two about whether or not the birth of a daughter is as "sacred" as the birth of a son illustrates their repartee--Fuller never hesitated to disagree with Emerson, but always did so with respect, grace and wit. Hudspeth (Univ. of Redlands) edited the definitive six-volume edition of Fuller's letters; this volume of selections from the larger oeuvre will make Fuller accessible to a larger number of readers. Specialists and general readers with an interest in 19th-century American culture alike owe a debt to Hudspeth for this welcome contribution to scholarship. (Feb.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

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Editorials

From the Publisher

"Hudspeth's selection of Margaret Fuller's letters is likely to win her new readers and admirers. . . . Had she survived, her public writings might have grown more like her private letters, capable of touching readers' emotions as well as their intellects. Perhaps the tragic story revealed in these letters will move Margaret Fuller beyond the textbooks at last."-Elaine Showalter, The Wilson Quarterly. Winter, 2001.

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly

Fuller (1810-1850) was the "it girl" of Transcendentalism and one of the most trenchant critics and insightful thinkers 19th-century America produced. She translated German literature, wrote for the New York Daily Tribune and edited the Transcendentalist magazine the Dial. In this valuable collection of Fuller's private correspondence, readers will find a precocious eight-year-old Margaret writing to her "Papa," assuring him that "If you have spies they will certainly inform you that we are not very dissipated," and keeping him apprised of her Latin studies. At 20, Fuller articulates her controversial religious convictions to a cousin. In a letter to her mother, she describes her whirlwind travels to Europe, admitting that she's relieved finally to be in one place for six months. Among the most revealing are her letters to James Freeman Clarke, a distant cousin, about Goethe, about the marriages of mutual acquaintances and about God. The letters to Emerson, Fuller's fellow Transcendentalist (and her successor at the Dial), are also a delight. A May 1843 dispute between the two about whether or not the birth of a daughter is as "sacred" as the birth of a son illustrates their repartee--Fuller never hesitated to disagree with Emerson, but always did so with respect, grace and wit. Hudspeth (Univ. of Redlands) edited the definitive six-volume edition of Fuller's letters; this volume of selections from the larger oeuvre will make Fuller accessible to a larger number of readers. Specialists and general readers with an interest in 19th-century American culture alike owe a debt to Hudspeth for this welcome contribution to scholarship. (Feb.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Library Journal

Culled from Hudspeth's previous six-volume Letters of Margaret Fuller (Cornell Univ.), this selection of letters draws a comprehensive and balanced picture of the transcendentalist, covering the full scope of her life from age eight until her death in 1850 in a shipwreck. To assist the reader, the editor provides very brief and exceedingly helpful biographical sketches of the correspondents. The letters are printed in their entirety, unlike the only other selection of her letters, edited by Perry Miller (Margaret Fuller: American Romantic, Peter Smith, 1983. o.p.), which has only a handful of extracts of letters from the last few years of her life. While many letters focus on her education and literary development, the family and social letters complete the picture of this extraordinary woman. This volume is an excellent alternative for academic and public libraries that were unable to afford the larger work.--Paolina Taglienti, Long Island Univ., Brooklyn, NY Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

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