Discover Free Books That You'll Love!
Receive unbeatable eBook deals in your favorite fiction or non-fiction genres. Our daily emails are packed with new and bestselling authors you will love!

 

Amazon Kindle  Kobo  Nook  Google  Audible  Apple iBooks
Book cover of Little Wing

Little Wing

by Joanne Horniman

Publisher: Allen & Unwin Pty., Limited
Pages: 180
Paperback
ISBN: 9781741148572






Available to Buy

Overview of Little Wing

Suffering from postpartum depression, Emily visits her grandmother to take a break from her life. As she tries to sort through her despair and self-hatred—seeing herself as a worthless teenage girl who abandoned her child—she is befriended by a stay-at-home dad and his son, Pete. Their friendships develop and Emily is able to nurture herself back from her depressive state. Poignant and hopeful, this narrative is told with an acute tenderness and reveals the reality of postpartum depression, the hardships of teenage pregnancy, and how to return to love after a tragic decision.

Synopsis of Little Wing


Suffering from postpartum depression, Emily visits her grandmother to take a break from her life. As she tries to sort through her despair and self-hatred—seeing herself as a worthless teenage girl who abandoned her child—she is befriended by a stay-at-home dad and his son, Pete. Their friendships develop and Emily is able to nurture herself back from her depressive state. Poignant and hopeful, this narrative is told with an acute tenderness and reveals the reality of postpartum depression, the hardships of teenage pregnancy, and how to return to love after a tragic decision.

KLIATT

Emily can hardly pull herself together enough to eat a meal and hold a brief conversation. Living with Charlotte, her mother's friend, Emily spends most of her time sleeping and feeling hollow. When Emily left home, she left behind Matt, her boyfriend, and Mahalia, their young daughter. Though Emily pretended everything was okay, she just couldn't do it anymore. She felt she couldn't love Mahalia enough, so she left. Emily keeps much of her thoughts and feelings to herself, but begins to open up just a bit when she befriends Martin, a stay-at-home father, and his young son, Pete. She hangs around their house, though she still spends most of her time falling asleep or dragging lifelessly about. After some months pass, Emily starts to feel the fog lift and is ready to go back to Matt and Mahalia. The little family she left behind has grown and changed and Emily must figure out how she fits into their lives. This companion to Mahalia, which tells of Matt and Mahalia's life after Emily leaves, is a beautiful, quiet exploration of what it means to be a parent. Emily, who clearly is suffering from postpartum depression, is heartbreakingly fragile. Her guilt and sorrow permeate her every minute. The plot doesn't contain much action, and Emily's lackadaisical nature is initially off-putting. However, character-driven readers will be immediately drawn in to the story by the supporting cast and will find Emily more accessible as her story unfolds. Horniman treats the complex issue of teen pregnancy and Emily's reactions and choices with respect. Reviewer: Amanda MacGregor

About the Author, Joanne Horniman


Joanne Horniman has worked as an editor, teacher, and artist. She is the author of several award-winning books for children and teenagers, including the A Charm of Powerful Trouble, Mahalia, and Secret Scribbled Notebooks.

Reviews of Little Wing

There are no reviews yet. Perhaps you can add one!

Editorials

From the Publisher

"This story of a young mother groping her way out of depression is depicted with great sensitivity. Emmy's slow rediscovery of her self-esteem feels very real."  —School Library Journal

"Horniman shines a light of realism on the two sides of the many struggles teen parents face."  —Kirkus Reviews

"Beautifully written, a perceptive and sensitive portrayal of a difficult time in a teenage girl's life."  —YARA

"A sensitive and direct discussion of postnatal depression & a touching and emotional journey."  —Courier Mail

"A warm, serious novel about courage, confidence and the reclamation of life."  —The Press

"There is a fragility to these characters, so delicately crafted, but so strong in spirit."  —Melina Marchetta, author, Looking for Alibrandi

"One of Australia's finest writers, Joanne Horniman has an exquisite honesty in her words, which observe the smallest details. Every sentence is beautiful and necessary."  —Weekend Australian

"This is a novel that clearly speaks to the heart, with a slow-burning hope at its core. Joanne Horniman is one of the best novelists writing books with big ideas and intimate characters for young people today. An exceptional experience."  —Magpies

KLIATT - Amanda MacGregor

Emily can hardly pull herself together enough to eat a meal and hold a brief conversation. Living with Charlotte, her mother's friend, Emily spends most of her time sleeping and feeling hollow. When Emily left home, she left behind Matt, her boyfriend, and Mahalia, their young daughter. Though Emily pretended everything was okay, she just couldn't do it anymore. She felt she couldn't love Mahalia enough, so she left. Emily keeps much of her thoughts and feelings to herself, but begins to open up just a bit when she befriends Martin, a stay-at-home father, and his young son, Pete. She hangs around their house, though she still spends most of her time falling asleep or dragging lifelessly about. After some months pass, Emily starts to feel the fog lift and is ready to go back to Matt and Mahalia. The little family she left behind has grown and changed and Emily must figure out how she fits into their lives. This companion to Mahalia, which tells of Matt and Mahalia's life after Emily leaves, is a beautiful, quiet exploration of what it means to be a parent. Emily, who clearly is suffering from postpartum depression, is heartbreakingly fragile. Her guilt and sorrow permeate her every minute. The plot doesn't contain much action, and Emily's lackadaisical nature is initially off-putting. However, character-driven readers will be immediately drawn in to the story by the supporting cast and will find Emily more accessible as her story unfolds. Horniman treats the complex issue of teen pregnancy and Emily's reactions and choices with respect. Reviewer: Amanda MacGregor

School Library Journal

Adult/High School

Seventeen-year-old Emily was overwhelmed by her pregnancy and new baby. She and her boyfriend, Matt, had little support from her family. Emmy was tired, stressed all the time taking care of Mahalia. After a few months she ran away, abandoning the infant to her boyfriend's care. Now she is living with her aunt and trying desperately to come to terms with her decision in the midst of a debilitating depression. Her dreams for her life with her child were shattered when she found she could not cope. Although she has a caring aunt and concerned parents, she floats through her days and evenings, never really connecting with anyone or anything, until she meets Martin and his son, Pete. They are the first people she really sees, and as she begins to watch them, their relationship brings the first glimmer of hope in her life since she left her baby. This story of a young mother groping her way out of depression is depicted with great sensitivity. Emmy's slow rediscovery of her self-esteem feels very real. Little Wing is a companion to Horniman's Mahalia (Knopf, 2003). It can be read alone, although those who do get involved with Emily's situation will seek out the first book.-Charlotte Bradshaw, San Mateo County Library, CA

Kirkus Reviews

This companion work to Mahalia (2004) presents the story of infant Mahalia's mother, where its predecessor chronicled her father's struggles with teen parenthood. Emily, wracked by post-partum depression, has abandoned her five-month-old child, leaving her in the young father's care. Fleeing across Australia to the home of her godmother, she spends her days sleeping too much, eating little and periodically savoring the pain of cutting herself. A stay-at-home father and his preschooler befriend her and help her-slowly-on the path of healing. When she eventually feels ready to care for her now year-old daughter, she finds much has changed there, with new issues to face. Engaging, sensitive prose follows Emily's struggle at a slow, deliberate pace that may frustrate some readers, but her depression is believable and readers will be caught up in their concern for her. Horniman shines a light of realism on the two sides of the many struggles teen parents face. As a stand-alone novel this works well, but is even more effective when paired with the companion work. (Fiction. 12 & up)

Available to Buy

Follow Us